Posts In: nutrition

Recipe: Bite Sized Blondies

December 4, 2016

With Lynne Whelehan Sheehan, Food and Lifestyle Blogger

Recently, I was researching almond flour recipes and came across a recipe for Blondies. A Blondie is essentially a Blonde Brownie. The recipe I had found online called for ½ cup of coconut oil and 1 cup of sugar. According to myfitnesspal.com a ½ cup coconut = 960 calories and 1 cup of sugar = 720 calories. I challenged myself to re-create the recipe omitting the above and decreasing the overall calorie content whilst keeping the delicious gooey Blondie consistency and texture. Baking with almond flour creates a dense, moreish Blondie, as you can see from the image. Allow them to cool before cutting into bite size pieces, this allows the mixture to set and easier to cut.

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with Mira, co-owner of Nectar, Bodytree’s in house juice bar

September is around the corner and its time to get back into a routine, gently returning to your workouts and regular eating habits. 

Try to eliminate high trigger allergens like dairy and gluten for a ten-day cycle and see how your body feels. Try to ease your digestion and start your day with warm water with a squeeze of lemon juice.  For breakfast, whiz up a healthy smoothie to gently ease your digestion and boost your metabolism into gear.
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Okay, admittedly it’s still far too hot to stand outside for long enough to even think about lighting a BBQ or grill, but it won’t be long before lots of us are doing just that and until then plenty of us are still enjoying grilled meats at brunches and restaurants.

Eating outside with friends is a fun, social pastime and not one I’m prepared to stop completely, but in recent years growing research has told us that cooking meat over a flame or frying at high temperatures increases our exposure to chemicals which can damage the DNA in our genes, possibly leading to certain cancers such as skin, liver and stomach cancer. The main culprits? Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). HCAs are created when high heat reacts with and changes the proteins in meat. PAHs are caused as juices and fat drips from meat into flames and the smoke caused rises and sticks to the meat; which we then eat. Adding certain spices and marinades can also change the chemical reactions that occur when meat is grilled.
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